5 Traditions of New Zealand’s Māori Culture | Should Know Before You G – Polynesian Print
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Today, the Maori community estimates for about 15% of the country's population. Māori have made an important contribution to bringing a unique culture to the nation. If you are planning a trip to New Zealand, pay attention that these 5 Maori traditional customs will give you an understanding and appreciation for this fascinating country and culture.

Hongi

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Hongi

Hongi is both a gesture of respect and a traditional greeting made by pressing other people's nose and forehead. Nature is like shaking hands in a thoughtful way, but the level of intimacy is more because the face is close together. Known as the breath of life, this custom originates from the first Maori woman, Hineahuone was born.

You will have a lot of opportunities to greet your guide in New Zealand, as well as the locals you meet on the way. Don't be too surprised by the level of intimate interaction and use it naturally when you get to know people.

Haka

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Famous for New Zealand All Blacks ruby team, who helped the traditional dance appear in an important cultural event on the world stage. Haka is a Maori fighting dance. The action-packed dance shows the strength and pride, through the powerful miles of legs, wide eyes and famous tongue. Today, this dance is used in rituals, Māori celebrations and to honor guests.

Ta Moko

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Traditionally, Ta Moko is an essential cultural representative of heritage, personal rank. Now, these tattoos are most often tattooed on the face, bottom and thighs for men, and on the lips and chin for women.

Ta Moko

Before European colonial times, tattoos were a series of intricate designs carved into the skin using sharp objects, often made of sharp bones or shark teeth, covered with ink and then touched the skin. Māori people consider that the head is the most sacred part of the body. That's why the face and head is a popular place for tattoos.

Whakairo

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Known as the Maori carvings, Whakairo is not only visually beautiful, it also tells an important story that expresses personal stories and cultural history. These stories are passed down from generation to generation and are often engraved by men on a variety of objects including weapons, tools, tools, buildings and canoes. Different styles among tribes, while different shapes represent different meanings. 

Whakairo

Hangi

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The cooking method called Hangi has been used for thousands of years by Māori culture but is often reserved for special occasions. The method of creating the perfect Hangi has been perfected for many years and passed from generation to generation.

HangiThis process is largely similar and includes preparation of meat, potatoes and vegetables by placing them in a pit dug into the ground, on hot and untreated stones, both should be burned for a long time. Three hours later and you have a meal suitable for an entire community.

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